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Terry Erwin, an insect researcher who specializes in beetles at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, has named almost 300 species in a genus of beetles called Agra.

Erwin noted that he’s got about 1,500 species in the Agra genus still awaiting names in a cabinet right outside his office door. And every time he goes collecting, he finds more new beetles. “This is a genus with endless species,” he said.

The group includes species like Agra sasquatch—named for its big feet. Erwin named its sister species Agra yeti.

Two others bear the names Agra vation and Agra vate. Erwin insists he wasn’t particularly annoyed when he named the two sister species. “It was just to use aggravation because it went with Agra,” he said.

Yet another beetle is named Agra ichabod for Ichabod Crane, the main character in The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, because the beetle Erwin used in his description of the species was missing its head.

"All the old guys who were strict Latin namers, I’ve outlived them all," Erwin said. Since he’s the only one left working to describe all the new Agra species, no one criticizes his name choices anymore, he said.

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From Darth Vader To Jelly Doughnuts, Weird Species Names Abound

this scientist is living my dream

(via mmmcoconut)

(Source: wandaventham)

djprincessk:

stop-hammerkind:

srsfunny:

Glass Blower: Sculpting A Horse From Molten Glass

WHAT

#this bitch just said let there be horse and there was

djprincessk:

stop-hammerkind:

srsfunny:

Glass Blower: Sculpting A Horse From Molten Glass

WHAT

#this bitch just said let there be horse and there was

deansdamnation:

thespyandthesoldier:

weight-a-second:

me too, Arya, me tooooo

This whole scene is golden.

you could hear arya going through puberty

(Source: gameofsnow)

scinerds:


Earth May Be in Early Days of 6th Mass Extinction

Earth may be in the early stages of a sixth mass extinction, an international team of scientists says.
Image: Neil deGrasse Tyson walks over to the ‘The Halls of Extinction’ - Cosmos: A Space time Odyssey
Animals and plants are threatened. More than 320 land vertebrates have gone extinct since 1500, the researchers said. The world’s remaining animals with backbones are 25 percent less abundant than in 1500— a trend also seen in invertebrate animals, such as crustaceans, worms and butterflies, the scientists reported.
The previous mass extinction, which wiped out the dinosaurs, happened about 65 million years ago, likely from a catastrophic asteroid that collided with Earth. In contrast, the looming sixth mass extinction is linked to human activity, Rodolfo Dirzo, a professor of biology at Stanford University in California, said in a statement. Dirzo is the lead author of the new review of past research on the topic, which suggests Earth is in the early days of this sixth mass extinction.
A past study, which involved data from the fossil record and modern-day conservation biology, suggested Earth could enter such a mass extinction within the next 300 to 2,000 years. That study was detailed in the March 2, 2011, issue of the journal Nature.
Up to one-third of all vertebrates are threatened or endangered, the researchers said. Large animals — such as elephants, rhinoceroses and polar bears — have the highest rates of decline, which is a trend shared by other mass extinctions. These large animals are at particular risk because they tend to have few offspring and low population growth rates. Hunters and poachers, however, find their fur, meat, tusks or horns attractive targets.
 Losing a species of large animal can have unexpected effects on the ecosystem and nearby human developments, a process known as defaunation. In one study, researchers isolated patches of land from animals, including zebra, giraffes and elephants. Without the animals, the grass and shrubs grew tall, and the soil became looser. Rodents quickly took over and doubled in numbers, eating the seeds from the plants and living in the patchy soil that was relatively predator-free.
Rodents can carry diseases and parasites that infect people, the researchers said.
"Where human density is high, you get high rates of defaunation, high incidence of rodents and thus high levels of pathogens, which increases the risks of disease transmission," Dirzo said. "Who would have thought that just defaunation would have all these dramatic consequences? But it can be a vicious circle."
The decline of big animals affects not only vegetation, but also invertebrates. In the past 50 years, the human population has doubled, and the number of invertebrate animals has dropped by 45 percent, the researchers said. Much of the loss is a result of habitat destruction and global climate disruption, the researchers said.

scinerds:

Earth May Be in Early Days of 6th Mass Extinction

Earth may be in the early stages of a sixth mass extinction, an international team of scientists says.

Image: Neil deGrasse Tyson walks over to the ‘The Halls of Extinction’ - Cosmos: A Space time Odyssey

Animals and plants are threatened. More than 320 land vertebrates have gone extinct since 1500, the researchers said. The world’s remaining animals with backbones are 25 percent less abundant than in 1500— a trend also seen in invertebrate animals, such as crustaceans, worms and butterflies, the scientists reported.

The previous mass extinction, which wiped out the dinosaurs, happened about 65 million years ago, likely from a catastrophic asteroid that collided with Earth. In contrast, the looming sixth mass extinction is linked to human activity, Rodolfo Dirzo, a professor of biology at Stanford University in California, said in a statement. Dirzo is the lead author of the new review of past research on the topic, which suggests Earth is in the early days of this sixth mass extinction.

A past study, which involved data from the fossil record and modern-day conservation biology, suggested Earth could enter such a mass extinction within the next 300 to 2,000 years. That study was detailed in the March 2, 2011, issue of the journal Nature.

Up to one-third of all vertebrates are threatened or endangered, the researchers said. Large animals — such as elephants, rhinoceroses and polar bears — have the highest rates of decline, which is a trend shared by other mass extinctions. These large animals are at particular risk because they tend to have few offspring and low population growth rates. Hunters and poachers, however, find their fur, meat, tusks or horns attractive targets.

Losing a species of large animal can have unexpected effects on the ecosystem and nearby human developments, a process known as defaunation. In one study, researchers isolated patches of land from animals, including zebra, giraffes and elephants. Without the animals, the grass and shrubs grew tall, and the soil became looser. Rodents quickly took over and doubled in numbers, eating the seeds from the plants and living in the patchy soil that was relatively predator-free.

Rodents can carry diseases and parasites that infect people, the researchers said.

"Where human density is high, you get high rates of defaunation, high incidence of rodents and thus high levels of pathogens, which increases the risks of disease transmission," Dirzo said. "Who would have thought that just defaunation would have all these dramatic consequences? But it can be a vicious circle."

The decline of big animals affects not only vegetation, but also invertebrates. In the past 50 years, the human population has doubled, and the number of invertebrate animals has dropped by 45 percent, the researchers said. Much of the loss is a result of habitat destruction and global climate disruption, the researchers said.

221b-bitch-please-street:

gabite:

cradily:

sophlaa:

cradily:

irish is such a shady language because hello is “dia duit” but directly translated it means “god be with you” and when someone says hello back they say “dia is muire duit” which means “god and mary be with you” .. its like “i see your god and i raise you the holy virgin whatcha gonna do bout it bitch”

irish isnt a language…

Ith mo thóin

image

rennoii:

berserkdragon:

YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS

Hey I’d look like that too. 

rennoii:

berserkdragon:

YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS

Hey I’d look like that too. 

(Source: theblackstonebureau)

Jun 8

theplaceinsidetheblizzard:

socialnetworkhell:

"Consensual sex" is just sex. To say that implies that there is such a thing as "non consensual sex", which there isn’t. That’s rape. That is what it needs to be called. There is only sex or rape. Do not teach people that rape is just another type of sex. They are two very separate events. You wouldn’t say "breathing swimming" and "non breathing swimming", you say swimming and drowning.

reblogging for that metaphor I like that metaphor.

Jun 8

spacemuffinz:

owljolson:

biomorphosis:

When you flip bats upside down they become exceptionally sassy dancers.

Just look at them

THEY ARE SO CUTE I COULD JUST SQUISH THEM AND RUB THEM ON MY FACE AWWWW

foomod:

Australian Opals from Planet Opal

THOSE AREN’T OPALS THOSE ARE EGGS

THOSE ARE TINY DRAGON EGGS THAT ARE HATCHING

(Source: lizardtakesflight)

crackpotter:

my favorite #YesAllWomen tweets are the ones where people finally get what feminism is all about, because it shows its actually doing something, as opposed to on tumblr where we’re all shouting about it to people who already agree with usimage